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Better to Take the Cab or Walk at Night in Las Vegas?

Safer on Foot or in a Taxi

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You have a decision to make when you are travelling on the strip in Las Vegas: you can either walk to where you need to go or take a taxi. Many people will make the decision based on convenience or cost. There is, however, another factor to be considered—safety.

Is it safer to take a cab or go by foot? This is not a question that can be answered simply and depends on numerous factors, including the cab driver and other drivers, condition of the vehicle, time of day, conditions outside, and other pedestrians. Nevertheless, one should be aware that both taxi cabs and walking pose certain risks.

Taxi Accidents in Las Vegas

According to data compiled by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, in 2014, there were 13,678 vehicle collisions in Las Vegas, which was a marked decrease from the prior year when there were nearly 24,000 collisions. With the increased interest in ridesharing programs, such as Uber and Lyft, it is likely the number of accidents involving passengers will increase, especially if these programs can skirt regulatory oversight.
Accidents involving taxis and other vehicles or taxis and pedestrians occur often in Las Vegas and throughout the state. Each day thousands of licensed taxi drivers transport individuals throughout the streets of Las Vegas; unfortunately, many are involved in serious accidents. The most common causes of accidents involving passenger vehicles include:

  • Failing to yield right of way;
  • Following too closely;
  • Failing to keep proper lane;
  • Driving too fast for conditions;
  • Unsafe lane changing;
  • Disregarding traffic signs, signals, and markings;
  • Driving while impaired from alcohol or other drugs; and
  • Distracted driving.

Pedestrian Accidents in Las Vegas

Accidents involving pedestrians also occur far too often in the streets of Las Vegas. In 2014, according to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, 34 pedestrians died from accidents involving vehicle collisions. While the number is down from 2013, when there were 47 pedestrian deaths, vehicles still pose a significant risk for pedestrians. So far in 2015, there have been 26 vehicle fatalities, 9 of which have been pedestrians.

Most accidents involving pedestrians occur because either the driver or the pedestrian failed to pay attention. The Nevada Department of Transportation used statistics from 2010 to identify that most crashes involving pedestrians happen during the period of noon to 9:00 p.m., with a peak period from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. And the most common days for crashes involving pedestrians were Tuesday and Friday; Sunday was the safest day.

Erin Breen, director of UNLV’s Vulnerable Road Users Project, said that one of the most dangerous places to cross a street is mid-road and not at a marked crosswalk. Breen did not want to unequivocally say that a pedestrian is safe crossing the street in Las Vegas, regardless if one is at a signal intersection, a mid-block crosswalk or jaywalking across the street. Las Vegas has recognized that pedestrian safety presents a growing problem for the city. Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman recently announced a five-year, $3.5 million program to improve pedestrian safety. Other initiatives include new traffic lights and other safety upgrades.

Injured in a Taxi Cab Accident? Contact a Clark County & Las Vegas Accident Lawyer

If you or a loved one has been injured in car or pedestrian accident, the experienced Las Vegas taxi accident attorneys at the Ladah Law Firm, PLLC can help protect your rights. Contact us today for a free initial consultation and case evaluation at 702-252-0055.

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517 S. 3rd Street
Las Vegas, NV 89101
Phone: (702) 252-0055